C3Subtitles: 32c3: G’scheitern
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G’scheitern

The art of failure taught by improv theatre

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Video duration
00:24:43
Language
English
Abstract
„Never ever say no, act your first thought and learn to love mistakes“ – these are the basic rules of improv theatre. I will show how this can be adopted for everyday life.

Improvisational theatre (short „improv theatre“) has a long history but still follows the same basic framework: be open minded and not afraid of yourself and others.
Keith Johnstone, the godfather of this genre, once said: „Good improvisers seem telepathic; everything looks pre-arranged. This is because they accept all offers made – which is something no ‘normal’ person would do.“ They can do so by learning that any mistake can be the origin of something great.
This can also be seen as a hack of the traditional arts form theatre: Create something awesome out of something awful.
The mantra behind is „if you fail, fail smartly“ or as we say in Austria <i>G’scheitern</i>.

There will also be a workshop for those who want to try out some improv theatre methods.

Talk ID
7138
Event:
32c3
Day
2
Room
Hall 2
Start
6:15 p.m.
Duration
00:30:00
Track
Failosophy
Type of
lecture
Speaker
Gregor Ruttner

Talk & Speaker speed statistics

Very rough underestimation:
171.7 wpm
880.7 spm
175.0 wpm
895.9 spm
100.0% Checking done100.0%
0.0% Syncing done0.0%
0.0% Transcribing done0.0%
0.0% Nothing done yet0.0%

Talk & Speaker speed statistics with word clouds

Whole talk:
171.7 wpm
880.7 spm
Gregor Ruttner:
175.0 wpm
895.9 spm